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Why I moved

Why I moved

Why I moved to Sweet Grass County

Four years ago my wife and I bought Terry and Jill Baird’s house on the East Boulder.  At first it was intended as a vacation home, but it quickly became home.  Here are some of the reasons why;

If I have a problem with my neighbor, we work it out.

Where I used to live, the first call was to a lawyer and the second was to a government agency.

If I want to cut a tree down on my own property, I go get a chainsaw.

Where I used to live, I could not cut a tree down on my own property unless I got a permit.  A permit takes time and costs money.  There are numerous regulations.

If I go to the park, I see kids playing.  They aren’t wearing helmets and knee pads.

Where I used to live, the parks are hangouts for drug dealers, drug users, thugs, and punks.  Kids on bikes wear body armor.

If I drive down the road, I see the occasional stop or speed limit sign.

Where I used to live, every block has at least a dozen signs telling me not to do this, I can only do that, and exactly how, when and where to do it or not do it.

If I decide to paint my house, I can use whatever color I want, whatever windows I want, and whatever heating system I want.

Where I used to live, alterations to a house have to be permitted. Permit regulations demand certain colors, windows, heaters and even garbage disposals.

If I want to buy some ammunition, I go buy it.

Where I used to live, you have to be fingerprinted in order to buy ammunition.

If I run for public office, I don’t have to be photogenic, slick, glib and a fastidious dresser.

Where I used to live, no one gets elected unless they look good on T.V., are a minority, and can talk like a trial lawyer.  Preferably all three.

If I want to start a business, people will applaud me.

Where I used to live, you have to hire a lawyer to start a business.  You have to run the gauntlet of environmental obstructionists and if you are lucky enough to succeed, you are called a greedy capitalist pig.

If I want to work hard, that’s normal.

Where I used to live, hard work is only for illegal immigrants (and capitalist pigs).

If I want to talk with someone, we speak English.

Where I used to live, English-speakers are a minority.  All government documents are in multiple languages.

If I have a serious problem, I can talk directly to the Sheriff.

Where I used to live, the Sheriff is not available for consultations with citizens.

If I want to recycle, it’s my choice.

Where I used to live, recycling and global warming are religions, enforced by a priesthood who are ordained by government paid nannies.  Violation of the commandments or creed is punished by stiff fines and public shame.

I think you can see why my wife and I moved to Sweetgrass County.

Geoff and Nancy Goble,

Happy new comers to Sweet Grass County.

4 Responses to “Why I moved”

  1. Gwen Petersen says:

    Good for you. I might need to create a poem utilizing all your points listed in your message.
    Cheers,
    Gwen

  2. Bryan says:

    Geoff and Nancy-Good for you-newcomers of your caliber are more than welcome here. I have never begrudged anyone for wanting out of whatever cesspool they had to live in. But, if they have moved here to get away from it, then leave it alone and don’t try to turn it into what it was that you were trying to get away from in the first place! This has happened so many times it makes me sick-just look at Boze-Angeles. That used to be a nice town until all the left wing wackos from Kalifornia started running for, (and actually getting elected to!), public offices. That place is forever ruined…..

    We’re glad you’re here-keep your conservative views, and help us keep what we have!

    Bryan.

  3. Gwen Petersen says:

    Where I Used To Live

    My wife and I have bought a dwelling ‘neath Montana’s big wide sky
    We’ve put down roots, made it our home and here are some of the reasons why

    If I have a conflict with my neighbor, we work to find a real solution
    Where I used to live: A lawyer first, then some government agent’s resolution

    If I want to cut down a tree on my own property, I get out my chainsaw
    Where I used to live: Regulations, permits, and rules if I’m allowed at all

    The kids in my town’s park don’t wear helmets, body armor and gang tatoos
    Where I used to live: Parks were home to druggies, dealers, thugs and booze

    When driving in my little town, I see the occasional stop or speed-limit sign
    Where I used to live: Dozens of signs of do’s and don’ts to keep me in line.

    I can choose my house paint, heating system, windows—do whatever I want to do
    Where I used to live: Permits required for color, windows, heaters, siding, too

    Here, if I want to purchase ammunition, I go to the store and buy it
    Where I used to live: You have to be fingerprinted before they’d let you acquire it

    Run for an office? I needn’t be pretty, a fancy dresser, slick, or glib
    Where I used to live: Savvy TV, be a minor’ty, speak lawyer squib

    Here, if I want to start a business, folks will applaud my gig
    Where I used to live: If I succeed, I’ll be called a greedy capitalist pig

    If I work hard, that’s normal here (folks will even help me dig)
    Where I used to live: Hard work is for illegals (and greedy capitalist pigs).

    If I want to converse with someone here, we speak the American English tongue
    Where I used to live: speaking English is as rare as an eclipse of the sun

    If I have a serious problem, I talk to the Sheriff about the situation
    Where I used to live: A Sheriff is unavailable for citizen consultation

    If I should care to recycle, it’s my choice; I’m no one’s passive pigeon
    Where I used to live: Recycling and global warming are religion

    Enforced by a priesthood ordained by government and paid nannies placing blame;
    Violations of commandments are punished by stiff fines and public shame.

    I think you can see why my wife and I made our home in the Big Sky State
    And I’m only sorry we made the decision so late.

  4. Debbie Hathaway says:

    Nice poem Gwen! You have an awesome way with words and some really good points and a reminder to be thankful for what we do have!!!

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